Zustandsklarheit
Important Things
Zustandsklarheit
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wholecracker:

drazowsky:

Because of course.

Yes
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liartownusa:

Sweet Valley High No.8 "Half a Pigeon"
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magnoliapearl:

shadesofgrayandgreen:

The Magician and the Snake: Mike and Katie Mignola (2003).
In honor of the Hallow E’en, he’s some Mike Mignola for you all. Well, in truth, the story was by his daughter, Katie. She won an Eisner for Best Short Story for it, too, making her by far the youngest recipient of the award. Runs in the family, it seems. Here’s an interview with the then-7-year-old on the Dark Horse website/blog:
"I don’t remember much about how I came up with the story other than that I painted a picture of a snake yelling at a bunch of shapes. I didn’t put any more thought into it until my dad asked me what I did at school that day and I told him about the picture. I made up the entire story on the spot and my dad said that he would like to use it in a comic. Over the course of a few months my dad drew the story, changing small details as he went such as the monkey king, which wasn’t in my original story. There were a few things that I wouldn’t let him change such as the magician’s style (he wanted him to be a parlor magician and I wanted a classic stars and moons magician) and the death of the magician. My dad suggested that the magician turn the snake into a lion so that he could eat the shapes and save the magician but I, for some reason, said that the magician had to die at the end."
Beautiful story, beautiful artwork.
 

This is the best comic I ever read
magnoliapearl:

shadesofgrayandgreen:

The Magician and the Snake: Mike and Katie Mignola (2003).
In honor of the Hallow E’en, he’s some Mike Mignola for you all. Well, in truth, the story was by his daughter, Katie. She won an Eisner for Best Short Story for it, too, making her by far the youngest recipient of the award. Runs in the family, it seems. Here’s an interview with the then-7-year-old on the Dark Horse website/blog:
"I don’t remember much about how I came up with the story other than that I painted a picture of a snake yelling at a bunch of shapes. I didn’t put any more thought into it until my dad asked me what I did at school that day and I told him about the picture. I made up the entire story on the spot and my dad said that he would like to use it in a comic. Over the course of a few months my dad drew the story, changing small details as he went such as the monkey king, which wasn’t in my original story. There were a few things that I wouldn’t let him change such as the magician’s style (he wanted him to be a parlor magician and I wanted a classic stars and moons magician) and the death of the magician. My dad suggested that the magician turn the snake into a lion so that he could eat the shapes and save the magician but I, for some reason, said that the magician had to die at the end."
Beautiful story, beautiful artwork.
 

This is the best comic I ever read
magnoliapearl:

shadesofgrayandgreen:

The Magician and the Snake: Mike and Katie Mignola (2003).
In honor of the Hallow E’en, he’s some Mike Mignola for you all. Well, in truth, the story was by his daughter, Katie. She won an Eisner for Best Short Story for it, too, making her by far the youngest recipient of the award. Runs in the family, it seems. Here’s an interview with the then-7-year-old on the Dark Horse website/blog:
"I don’t remember much about how I came up with the story other than that I painted a picture of a snake yelling at a bunch of shapes. I didn’t put any more thought into it until my dad asked me what I did at school that day and I told him about the picture. I made up the entire story on the spot and my dad said that he would like to use it in a comic. Over the course of a few months my dad drew the story, changing small details as he went such as the monkey king, which wasn’t in my original story. There were a few things that I wouldn’t let him change such as the magician’s style (he wanted him to be a parlor magician and I wanted a classic stars and moons magician) and the death of the magician. My dad suggested that the magician turn the snake into a lion so that he could eat the shapes and save the magician but I, for some reason, said that the magician had to die at the end."
Beautiful story, beautiful artwork.
 

This is the best comic I ever read
magnoliapearl:

shadesofgrayandgreen:

The Magician and the Snake: Mike and Katie Mignola (2003).
In honor of the Hallow E’en, he’s some Mike Mignola for you all. Well, in truth, the story was by his daughter, Katie. She won an Eisner for Best Short Story for it, too, making her by far the youngest recipient of the award. Runs in the family, it seems. Here’s an interview with the then-7-year-old on the Dark Horse website/blog:
"I don’t remember much about how I came up with the story other than that I painted a picture of a snake yelling at a bunch of shapes. I didn’t put any more thought into it until my dad asked me what I did at school that day and I told him about the picture. I made up the entire story on the spot and my dad said that he would like to use it in a comic. Over the course of a few months my dad drew the story, changing small details as he went such as the monkey king, which wasn’t in my original story. There were a few things that I wouldn’t let him change such as the magician’s style (he wanted him to be a parlor magician and I wanted a classic stars and moons magician) and the death of the magician. My dad suggested that the magician turn the snake into a lion so that he could eat the shapes and save the magician but I, for some reason, said that the magician had to die at the end."
Beautiful story, beautiful artwork.
 

This is the best comic I ever read
magnoliapearl:

shadesofgrayandgreen:

The Magician and the Snake: Mike and Katie Mignola (2003).
In honor of the Hallow E’en, he’s some Mike Mignola for you all. Well, in truth, the story was by his daughter, Katie. She won an Eisner for Best Short Story for it, too, making her by far the youngest recipient of the award. Runs in the family, it seems. Here’s an interview with the then-7-year-old on the Dark Horse website/blog:
"I don’t remember much about how I came up with the story other than that I painted a picture of a snake yelling at a bunch of shapes. I didn’t put any more thought into it until my dad asked me what I did at school that day and I told him about the picture. I made up the entire story on the spot and my dad said that he would like to use it in a comic. Over the course of a few months my dad drew the story, changing small details as he went such as the monkey king, which wasn’t in my original story. There were a few things that I wouldn’t let him change such as the magician’s style (he wanted him to be a parlor magician and I wanted a classic stars and moons magician) and the death of the magician. My dad suggested that the magician turn the snake into a lion so that he could eat the shapes and save the magician but I, for some reason, said that the magician had to die at the end."
Beautiful story, beautiful artwork.
 

This is the best comic I ever read
magnoliapearl:

shadesofgrayandgreen:

The Magician and the Snake: Mike and Katie Mignola (2003).
In honor of the Hallow E’en, he’s some Mike Mignola for you all. Well, in truth, the story was by his daughter, Katie. She won an Eisner for Best Short Story for it, too, making her by far the youngest recipient of the award. Runs in the family, it seems. Here’s an interview with the then-7-year-old on the Dark Horse website/blog:
"I don’t remember much about how I came up with the story other than that I painted a picture of a snake yelling at a bunch of shapes. I didn’t put any more thought into it until my dad asked me what I did at school that day and I told him about the picture. I made up the entire story on the spot and my dad said that he would like to use it in a comic. Over the course of a few months my dad drew the story, changing small details as he went such as the monkey king, which wasn’t in my original story. There were a few things that I wouldn’t let him change such as the magician’s style (he wanted him to be a parlor magician and I wanted a classic stars and moons magician) and the death of the magician. My dad suggested that the magician turn the snake into a lion so that he could eat the shapes and save the magician but I, for some reason, said that the magician had to die at the end."
Beautiful story, beautiful artwork.
 

This is the best comic I ever read
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actegratuit:

Kilian Eng on tumblr
actegratuit:

Kilian Eng on tumblr
actegratuit:

Kilian Eng on tumblr
actegratuit:

Kilian Eng on tumblr
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kiuchitatsuro:

mejirushi:
Package illustrations I did for Yuzu Tea.
kiuchitatsuro:

mejirushi:
Package illustrations I did for Yuzu Tea.
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Sketch requests?? How about some Samus Aran!
— dkraus00
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darksilenceinsuburbia:

Tamsin van Essen
Erosion Series
This work explores erosion and the disruption of form. Focusing on biological erosion, I wanted to convey the idea of a host being attacked and eaten away by a parasitic virus, highlighting the creeping spread of the infection as it corrupts the body. I have produced a series of angular porcelain forms, sandblasted to wear the surface and reveal inner strata. This aggressive process, contrarily, creates a delicate vulnerability in the shape. The translucency of the porcelain and the interruption of the surface make it possible to glimpse through to layers beneath, creating a tension between the seen and the obscured.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Tamsin van Essen
Erosion Series
This work explores erosion and the disruption of form. Focusing on biological erosion, I wanted to convey the idea of a host being attacked and eaten away by a parasitic virus, highlighting the creeping spread of the infection as it corrupts the body. I have produced a series of angular porcelain forms, sandblasted to wear the surface and reveal inner strata. This aggressive process, contrarily, creates a delicate vulnerability in the shape. The translucency of the porcelain and the interruption of the surface make it possible to glimpse through to layers beneath, creating a tension between the seen and the obscured.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Tamsin van Essen
Erosion Series
This work explores erosion and the disruption of form. Focusing on biological erosion, I wanted to convey the idea of a host being attacked and eaten away by a parasitic virus, highlighting the creeping spread of the infection as it corrupts the body. I have produced a series of angular porcelain forms, sandblasted to wear the surface and reveal inner strata. This aggressive process, contrarily, creates a delicate vulnerability in the shape. The translucency of the porcelain and the interruption of the surface make it possible to glimpse through to layers beneath, creating a tension between the seen and the obscured.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Tamsin van Essen
Erosion Series
This work explores erosion and the disruption of form. Focusing on biological erosion, I wanted to convey the idea of a host being attacked and eaten away by a parasitic virus, highlighting the creeping spread of the infection as it corrupts the body. I have produced a series of angular porcelain forms, sandblasted to wear the surface and reveal inner strata. This aggressive process, contrarily, creates a delicate vulnerability in the shape. The translucency of the porcelain and the interruption of the surface make it possible to glimpse through to layers beneath, creating a tension between the seen and the obscured.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Tamsin van Essen
Erosion Series
This work explores erosion and the disruption of form. Focusing on biological erosion, I wanted to convey the idea of a host being attacked and eaten away by a parasitic virus, highlighting the creeping spread of the infection as it corrupts the body. I have produced a series of angular porcelain forms, sandblasted to wear the surface and reveal inner strata. This aggressive process, contrarily, creates a delicate vulnerability in the shape. The translucency of the porcelain and the interruption of the surface make it possible to glimpse through to layers beneath, creating a tension between the seen and the obscured.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Tamsin van Essen
Erosion Series
This work explores erosion and the disruption of form. Focusing on biological erosion, I wanted to convey the idea of a host being attacked and eaten away by a parasitic virus, highlighting the creeping spread of the infection as it corrupts the body. I have produced a series of angular porcelain forms, sandblasted to wear the surface and reveal inner strata. This aggressive process, contrarily, creates a delicate vulnerability in the shape. The translucency of the porcelain and the interruption of the surface make it possible to glimpse through to layers beneath, creating a tension between the seen and the obscured.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Tamsin van Essen
Erosion Series
This work explores erosion and the disruption of form. Focusing on biological erosion, I wanted to convey the idea of a host being attacked and eaten away by a parasitic virus, highlighting the creeping spread of the infection as it corrupts the body. I have produced a series of angular porcelain forms, sandblasted to wear the surface and reveal inner strata. This aggressive process, contrarily, creates a delicate vulnerability in the shape. The translucency of the porcelain and the interruption of the surface make it possible to glimpse through to layers beneath, creating a tension between the seen and the obscured.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Tamsin van Essen
Erosion Series
This work explores erosion and the disruption of form. Focusing on biological erosion, I wanted to convey the idea of a host being attacked and eaten away by a parasitic virus, highlighting the creeping spread of the infection as it corrupts the body. I have produced a series of angular porcelain forms, sandblasted to wear the surface and reveal inner strata. This aggressive process, contrarily, creates a delicate vulnerability in the shape. The translucency of the porcelain and the interruption of the surface make it possible to glimpse through to layers beneath, creating a tension between the seen and the obscured.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Tamsin van Essen
Erosion Series
This work explores erosion and the disruption of form. Focusing on biological erosion, I wanted to convey the idea of a host being attacked and eaten away by a parasitic virus, highlighting the creeping spread of the infection as it corrupts the body. I have produced a series of angular porcelain forms, sandblasted to wear the surface and reveal inner strata. This aggressive process, contrarily, creates a delicate vulnerability in the shape. The translucency of the porcelain and the interruption of the surface make it possible to glimpse through to layers beneath, creating a tension between the seen and the obscured.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Tamsin van Essen
Erosion Series
This work explores erosion and the disruption of form. Focusing on biological erosion, I wanted to convey the idea of a host being attacked and eaten away by a parasitic virus, highlighting the creeping spread of the infection as it corrupts the body. I have produced a series of angular porcelain forms, sandblasted to wear the surface and reveal inner strata. This aggressive process, contrarily, creates a delicate vulnerability in the shape. The translucency of the porcelain and the interruption of the surface make it possible to glimpse through to layers beneath, creating a tension between the seen and the obscured.
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kierongillen:

barbeauxbot:


Are You a Member of Gaming’s Feminist Illuminati? by Rachel Atwood
Show off your super secret club membership to Gaming’s Feminist Illuminati with this t-shirt, created by Bad at Games’ Elizabeth Simins.

lillinox we need these

Ditto.
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kareart:

contemporary by Yusuke Moritani a.k.a KARE (2014) Japan
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Why can’t this be me
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notalkingplz:

 
notalkingplz:

 
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isiope:

no. 2108 - Jonas Schmidt - www.isiope.com